Grace is dangerous

In my recent post on church discipline I said “We’ve got to stop living in fear and allow ourselves to take the risk of being a people of grace.

In related news, our Preaching Team at The Well is reading Paul Zaul’s book, Grace in Practice: A Theology for Everyday Life,

“Or maybe the grace came out after your son’s car crash. Rod Rosenbladt, a Lutheran theologian, tells the true story of wrecking his father’s Buick 8 when he was sixteen years old. Rod was drunk, as were all his friends who were in the car. The first thing Rod’s dad asked him over the phone was whether he was all right. Rod said yes. He also told his father he was drunk. Later that night, Rod wept and wept in his father’s study. At the end of the ordeal, his father said one thing: “How about tomorrow we go get you a new car.” Rod says now that he became a theist in that moment. God’s grace became real.

When Rod tells that story, there are always a few people in the audience who get mad. They say, “Your dad let you get away with that?! He didn’t punish you at all?” And Rod says, “No,” adding the following: “Do you think I didn’t know what I had done? Do you think it was not the most painful moment of my whole life up to that point? Do you think the law wasn’t cutting me down to nothing?” Rod’s father spoke the word of grace in that moment. In that eternal encounter, for it reflected the mechanism of God’s grace, there was no law. The law’s dominion came to an end. Grace superseded it.”

Sounds like a risky response.

It also sounds amazing.

This is exactly what I meant.